Democrats poised to break records in this 2018 midterm election.

By | 2018-10-19T08:25:44+00:00 October 20th, 2018|Categories: News|Tags: , , , , , |9 Comments

I am hanging ten as I ride this blue wave to victory!

Courtesy of NYT:

A wide range of evidence indicates that Democratic voters are poised to vote in numbers unseen in a midterm election in at least a decade.

Democrats have largely erased the turnout deficit that hobbled them during the Obama presidency, according to results from more than 50 New York Times Upshot/Siena College polls of the most competitive House battleground districts.

Democrats may even be poised to post higher turnout than Republicans, a rarity, in many relatively white suburban districts on Nov. 6.

Across the Times/Siena polls, Republicans have a six-point lead among voters who turned out in 2014. But Democrats counter with a 10-point advantage among voters who didn’t turn out in that election. Those voters are poised to represent more than one-third of the electorate, enough to essentially eliminate the Republican turnout advantage of the last decade.

There are a lot of folks suggesting that Democrats should not get too excited, that polls may not actually reflect the reality and Democrats may once again disappoint. 

But that is certainly not what I have seen.

I have seen people, especially women, so ready to cast their vote that they are literally vibrating with anticipation. 

In other words, they are “fired up and ready to go.”

Early voting in Alaska starts on Monday, October 22nd, and if you think I will not be there minutes after the doors open well then you do not know me.

Hopefully, all of you will not be too far behind. 

About the Author:

This blog is dedicated to finding the truth, exposing the lies, and holding our politicians and leaders accountable when they fall far short of the promises that they have made to both my fellow Alaskans and the American people.

9 Comments

  1. Teen-ish Mommy October 20, 2018 at 4:33 am

    Do millenials know they cannot instagram or tweet their ballot, they must perform a physical action on a piece of paper called a ballot. A piece of paper comes from a tree. A pen is what was used before a phone. It can be found at a store, and does not require a battery or a charge. If still unsure as to what a ballot or pen are, there is a hole on your face called a mouth, from which language is spoken. So use your mouth to ask a person, who has flesh, and does not require a battery or a charge.

  2. Anon October 20, 2018 at 5:09 am

    I was so angry about Kavanaugh, i donated money to jacky rosen (her opponent called dr ford, a hiccup.) and started to write postcards to voters. I just bought my second batch of 100 cards.

    • Anon October 20, 2018 at 9:22 am

      https://www.tomdispatch.com/post/176484/tomgram%3A_belle_chesler%2C_the_kavanaugh_hearings_just_won%27t_leave_me_alone/

      “high-tech lynching” <Uncle Tom

      "How could I forget the fire in her eyes or the cool precision of her responses to that phalanx of old white men so titillated by her answers as they pressed her for more salacious details?
      Such Kavanaugh moments raise big problems for the teachers among us. What’s a teacher to do with a teachable moment that runs counter to all that American youngsters have customarily been taught to believe? Taking in her testimony, I found myself growing distraught. As her voice quavered, I felt a surge of emotion so strong it seemed to paralyze me. I couldn’t stop looking even though I knew something inside was tearing me apart and that, no matter my emotional state, I would still have to pull myself together to face my first class of the day, only moments away. I couldn’t shake the feeling that I was watching a woman sacrificing herself before the nation, just as Anita Hill had done so many years before.

      What I didn’t tell them were the details of my story-All those details are gone. His face, his smell, and that machete are not.

      As the Kavanaugh hearings went on, more and more students became invested in watching them. Some asked to listen on headphones while we worked, some just wanted to talk about what they’d heard. As each class began, I addressed the fact that I’d been crying all day — no point in pretending, teenagers notice everything — and explained why. As I talked, I noted certain students around the room crumpling. Bodies pulled in on themselves, heads lowered. Some students shyly wiped away tears. A few of them asked to leave the room to get some air.
      The hardest part of that day wasn’t sharing my story or opening up to groups of teenagers about the intimate details of my past. It was listening as my students argued about whether or not Dr. Ford’s testimony would even matter. One of my students came up to me after class and told me that, though her stepbrother had assaulted her when she was younger, no one in her family believed her. She assured me that she was fine now because she had moved away and didn’t have to see him anymore. As she was telling me this, I couldn’t help imagining her, 10 or 20 years down the line, reflecting with startled pain on the way her own family dismissed her, the way the people charged with her love and care wouldn’t or couldn’t believe her.
      Those Laughing Faces.
      What fascinated me was not the obvious cruelty of his series of low blows, but the beaming smiles and laughter of the men and women in that crowd of supporters in Southhaven, Mississippi.

      I couldn’t help but wonder how many of them, beneath that veneer of laughter, had felt a twinge of something familiar in the pit of their stomach as they listened to Ford’s testimony.
      How many of them would be shocked to know about assaults suffered by their own children?

      I told them that I would listen, even when it seemed like no one else would. – the memory of the hearings, and all it represented, will be seared, as Dr. Ford might have put it, into the hippocampus, never to fade."

      Posted Twice.

    • VOTE October 20, 2018 at 9:43 am

      Are you from Nevada? I am, and wondering where you get these postcards and addresses. I REALLY don’t want Heller to be able to serve Trump for another six years. Plus, I know Heller personally and I can tell you with certainty, he’s an ass. Anything I can do, in addition to voting for Rosen, I’m happy to do.

  3. Anonymous October 20, 2018 at 5:58 am

    I early voted Friday and had to stand in line for an hour. I live in Tennessee and voted straight blue. I’m hoping former Gov. Phil Bredesen can defeat Rep. Marsha Blackburn. Bredesen was a very popular mayor and equality popular two-term governor. He crossed the aisle and worked with both parties. He’s run a clean, decent campaign; however! He said one nice thing about Brett Kavanaugh and now many Democrats in the state are pissed off and he’s lost momentum. I despise Kavanaugh and stand with Dr. Ford, but I’m not holding Bredesen’s support of Kavanaugh against him. In the long run, Bredesen would be far better for Tennessee than Blackburn.

  4. Anonymous October 20, 2018 at 7:08 am

    I already voted absentee ballot in MI, the republican governor, King Rick and his cronies eliminated straight ticket voting because “they want people to think about who they are voting for down the ballot” yea right ( The citizens have a proposal on the ballot to return to straight ticket as well as one to end gerrymandering by politicians )

    The ballot was VERY LONG this time and I hope people are going to take the time to finish it, I expect very long lines and hoping folks do not get discouraged and leave.

    This was the first time I have voted for ALL WOMEN straight down the ticket!!!!! Just about the only men running were rethugs (bye, bye)

  5. The Purge October 20, 2018 at 8:18 am

    https://www.politicususa.com/2018/10/20/georgia-election-rigging-explodes-as-gop-candidate-purged-340k-voter-registrations.html

    Brian Kemp – Georgia secretary of state and Republican nominee for governor – purged more than 500,000 voter registrations in Georgia, claiming these residents either moved or passed away. after analyzing the half a million purged voter registrations, Palast found that a stunning 340,134 of them did not move or die – they simply got removed from the voter rolls without any notice. another analysis found that over 100,000 voters in Georgia were purged from the rolls in a single day in 2017.

  6. Anonymous October 20, 2018 at 8:30 am

    Watch out for that blue trickle.

  7. Anonymous October 20, 2018 at 2:55 pm

    Democrats also surpassed Republicans in fundraising.

    But that doesn’t necessarily translate to votes.

    And we are suffering now for the cockiness in 2016 of assuming a win.

    There are three weeks to go. While the House looks good if the Senate is lost you are looking at the loss of Roe v Wade, the ACA, Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security just for starters. There is no end to the destruction that they will continue for the next two years and possibly another four after that.

Comments are closed.